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Friday, 22 January 2016

Streets Ahead (a #1000speak post)

1000 Voices Speak for Compassion. #1000speak
It would be impossible to write this post without sounding like I'm blowing my own trumpet, because the events of the two (short, I promise) compassion stories I'm about to share with you, were born of my own compassion. But, it's not MY horn I want to blow today... Ignore my horn! :o)

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A while back, November-ish I think, Hubs and I were on our way to post some letters when we passed a homeless guy. He was sat on the pavement; head down, eyes closed, huddled. 
Within moments of passing the man I was kicking myself for not stopping, and knowing that we would be crossing his path again on our way back to the Co-op I asked Hubs if he had any spare change in his pocket. He dug out what he had. It wasn't much. 

The mans reaction when we stopped and handed over 'not-much' was smashing. His face lit up instantly. His expression a mix of surprise and... actually I'm not quite sure about the and; relief with a hint of joy I think. 
At this point he had already made my day!

We said goodbye to the man and crossed the road to the Co-op, stopping first at the cash point just outside the store. While I was waiting for Hubs to withdraw the money we would need for our shopping I noticed another (elderly, frail) homeless man sat just to the right of us, outside the bakers. 

I turned to hubs, and was just about to ask him if we could spare anything else, when I heard... "Come on mate, up ya get, I'll buy ya some breakfast." followed by a mumbled, (inaudible to me) reply. 

I turned toward the voices (as nosey people do ;) and then watched in awe, as he (the man we'd just left on the other side of the street with not-much to his name) gently helped the somewhat bemused elderly man to his somewhat shaky feet. 
Turns out not-much, as far as Mr Compassionate was concerned, was enough. More than enough for two!

I turned back to hubs, and under my breath, asked, 'Can we spare a bit more?'.

After adding a-little-bit-more to their not-much , we said goodbye to Mr Shaky and Mr Compassionate. They, one held up by the other and both smiling, shuffled off in the direction of the nearest cafe. We, also smiling, disappeared into the co-op to get the food we needed to cover our own meals that week. 

Someone once said (Mary Poppins, I think), "Enough is as good as a feast."... Well then, I hope my Mr Compassionate, was served 'enough' fit for a king!

***

1000 VOICES SPEAK FOR COMPASSION... It would be impossible to write this post without sounding like I'm blowing my own trumpet, because the events of the two (short, I promise) compassion stories I'm about to share with you, were born of my own compassion. But, it's not MY horn I want to blow today... Ignore my horn! :o)

Some weeks later; the week between Christmas and New Year. We (me, Hubs and Littlie) were on our way to The Book Shop in Town (to spend Littlie's book-vouchers), when we saw another homeless man, sat on a concrete step between two shops. Eyes to pavement. In a world of his own.

He looked up, startled, when hubs approached him, and was just about to accept the coins offered when he suddenly pushed Hubby's hand away, exclaiming, "No, I can't!" 

At first I thought we'd offended him, hurt his pride, but then he gestured toward Littlie (in her wheelchair) and said, "Disabled, I can't take from disabled, it's not right." 

His reaction took my breath away. He was so sincere. Clearly, more concerned for us than for himself. Choked up even. 

We're not well off by any means, Dear reader, but we had, just days earlier, enjoyed Christmas dinner (and pudding), by fairy-light-glow.  Opened gifts. Eaten sweets. Watched Christmas TV... Together.
We have a roof over our heads; food in the cupboards. Hot water, home comforts, warm beds... Each other. 
We're a long way from concrete!

Anyway, I, made brave by HIS compassion; took the coins from hubs, approached the man myself, and said,  "please take it. It's not much, and I promise you... we have enough." 

The man (I wish I'd asked his name) took the coins from my hand and said 'Thank you'. 

As we turned to walk away he called out, 'Wait'. Then he stood up and shuffled towards us, saying, (addressing Littlie, but looking between us and her for approval), "Let me give you something; can I give you a kiss, Child." then gently, (as gentlemen do) he leaned forward and  kissed Littlie on the cheek. 

The Mum-in-me (without meaning to) had mentally clocked his grubby beard, queried germs, made a mental note to dig out the wet wipes when we were out of sight. 
The ever-present-fear-in-me was on edge, not quite sure, fingers-crossed. Because, well, that's me. 
But I didn't stop him. Nor (amazingly, for a germ obsessive such as me) did I wipe away his gift; his compassion (his 'enough'), when we were out of sight. 

They didn't amount to much; the coins we gave him... they never do. 
But there was love (and compassion) in the giving, and an unspoken; 'I-hope-it's-enough'. 

Much like his gift to us! 

***

Thank you for allowing me to share

I wish you enough. 

Kimmie x 

1000 Speak for Compassion.

***

There are so many #1000speak contributions, from bloggers all over the World.... I encourage you to check them out if you get a chance, I'm sure you'll find some that resonate with you. 

You can do that by following @1000speak on Twitter or by checking out the '1000 Voices for Compassion' Face book page Here

#1000SPEAK FOR COMPASSION 
Speaking for GOOD on the 20th of every month

***

Related Post: Somebody's Son 

 

33 comments :

  1. Lovely bittersweet stories both of them. Those with little to give can sometimes just give of themselves. The other day when I was feeling pretty down, a wound down my car window to give a few coins to one of those window washers who haunt the intersections in the city. As I handed them over, he said to me "you're so pretty." 'Shallow as this sounds, after a day of feeling not so pretty, this brought some tears to my eyes. He chose to give what he had that cost nothing, a few words, that made a difference in my day.

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    1. Aw... Thank you for sharing that. How lovely, and as you say, it cost him nothing, but made a huge difference to your day. Some people are just special IMO, and that's always enough. :)

      Thanks so much for hopping over, and for taking the time to connect!

      Wishing you a lovely Weekend. Kimmie x

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  2. What lovely lessons. Thank you so much for sharing them.

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  3. Sad and beautiful at the same time. I have no words. Thanks for sharing with them and us too.

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    1. Thank you for reading. I'm so glad the post spoke to you. I'm grateful to the men in the stories. I was so touched by their compassion.

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  4. What beautiful stories - remind me of the Amelia Earhart quote; "A single act of kindness throws out roots in all directions, and the roots spring up and make new tress". Thank you for sharing. :)

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    1. What a gorgeous quote. I'd not heard it before. Thank you for sharing that with me. :)

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  5. Gorgeous, gorgeous, gorgeous stories of compassion, dear one. I love your heart and your kindness, and that you inspired (and enabled) sharing and compassion to be shown by others. Love, LOVE this.

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    1. Aw, Thanks Lizzi. The real thanks for the beauty in this post must go to my two MR's though. MR & MR Compassion :o)

      Street-Hearts!

      I knew you'd love this... your heart/compassion matches the MR's :) x

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  6. "A long way from concrete." - Wow. That really makes it real.
    As someone who has had some reactions like that from strangers, as I was born blind, do not know if I could have taken that man's gift as easily, but he had good intentions. I am a bit of a germ phobic too and I don't like strangers to touch me, but being someone with a disability gets a lot of such reactions from people. I guess I am coming fromm your story a different direction, but I like how you gave what you could.

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    1. Hi Kerry. Thanks for reading. ... A different direction is good. It would be boring if we all had the same perspective :)

      I am only able to interact myself because hubs is with me... and even then there are times when I'm too nervous, and leave the interactions to hubs. This guy was so genuine though, I (though thinking the worse, briefly) kinda knew he would do no harm.

      Thanks again for stopping by. All the best. Kimmie.

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  7. Such beautiful stories of compassion and reminders that we all have enough to share something. Thank you for sharing THIS. :) --Sondi

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    1. Thank you, Sondi. Yes, we all have to share 'something'... and we all have 'something' to share :)

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  8. They are beautiful stories. You are so right, it doesn't matter what or how much we give as long as it is given whole heartedly.
    Amanda #weekendblogshare.

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    1. Thank you, Amanda. I'm glad you enjoyed the stories. ... "as long as it is given wholeheartedly"... Absolutely! :)

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  9. Another beautiful post, Kimmie.....and just goes to show, even the darkest of corners can hold a dazzling light in the smile of a stranger, when care and compassion are allowed to shine through....

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    1. Yes, Lynn. 'Compassion brings hope to the darkest of places' :)

      Thanks so much for reading/commenting/sharing, Lynn. I really appreciate it :) x

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  10. Lovely post and a reminder that we can all make a difference, one small kindness at a time.

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    1. Thank you, Cheryl. "one small kindness at a time"... YES! :)

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  11. What truly wonderful stories - they made my day :-)

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  12. Lovely stories, Kimmie. Your love and compassion is inspiring. So too is the compassion of the men you describe. What a wonderful world it would be if those with more than enough were able to share that more to ensure that all had enough. I could do better too. Thank you for your wishes of enough. It's really all we should ask. Thank you for the reminder. Best wishes. Hugs. xo

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    1. Hi, Norah. Indeed. What a wonderful world it would be!. There's enough to go around... could be better distributed though.

      *hugging you back* xoxo

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  13. Both stories touched my heart! I agree with Norah, your love and compassion is inspiring; and so the is the compassion shown by the men in need. I'm so glad you wrote about them; they were stories that needed to be told and read.

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  14. You are an example to all who know/love you. I just wish I could send your blog to every selfish greedy politician in this country!! xxx

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    1. Aw, Thank you, Carol. I think it's the men in the story who are the real example though. As for the selfish-&-greedy among politicians, I shouldn't think my ramblings would make much difference to their hearts. o_O

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  15. Both are excellently woven stories. One simple kindness can alter the world. Beautiful read thank you. Ellen Best. X

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  16. Both are excellently woven stories. One simple kindness can alter the world. Beautiful read thank you. Ellen Best. X

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    1. Thank you, Ellen... for taking the time to read/comment. I'm glad you enjoyed the stories. Kimmie x

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  17. Where was I in January and how did I miss this??? Kimmie, this is so beautiful. Exactly the kind of thing I hope for in the world. I especially love love love the first story. Tears in my coffee right now, my dear. But happy ones. <3

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    1. Aw, Lisa... I'm so glad you got to read it today. These were definitely human-beans worth sharing :)

      Thanks for hopping over...and for your lovely comment.

      *Passes fresh cuppa* ;o) x

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